About Art and Artists

All kinds of art from all kinds of artists


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Muybridge Project Artist Statement

I originally wanted to draw out the motions of changing clothes, but realized it would take too long and possibly not come out the way I hoped. Therefore, I went the video and performance route which I believe successfully shows the movement I wanted. I went with this idea because I felt that a lot goes into something as simple as changing clothes. We don’t really pay attention to it, but we move a lot when doing so. Surprisingly, doing this long enough gets you tired or feeling hot and I wanted viewers to get a sense of that frustration with my video. Many people can relate with trying on clothes and not being satisfied, so they keep changing, and changing in hopes that they finally find the right outfit. I tried to make this video interesting and fun. The music I chose was to emphasize playfulness in addition to some humor. A small story is presented without words, implying that the character (me) is trying to find a certain style of outfit, but the viewers aren’t sure of what until the very end. Speeding up the video was not only to keep it short, but to also focus, again, on how much goes into changing. Changing clothes is something all humans do and that was enough reason for me to make it my subject for a Muybridge inspired project.

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Bruce Nauman

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Bruce Nauman is an American contemporary artist who’s media ranges from sculpture, photography, neon, video, drawing, printmaking and performance. Since 1970 he has been considered one of the most innovative and even provocative of all contemporary artists. He finds his inspiration in the activities, speeches and materials of everyday life. His artwork varies, but usually is about people or body parts. His neon pieces are the most recognizable as many of them either involve text or some sort of sexual content. A lot of his work comes off as playful, but adult. Perhaps some could even be considered uncomfortable. Overall, I think Bruce does a successful job of making his audience feel mixed emotions. When looking at his work I feel a sense of curiosity and discomfort. A lot of his art has an erotic sense to them and that may be enticing to some, but for me it makes me blush. However, I think this is exactly what Bruce is going for. He wants to take the unspeakable and put it in plain view. It certainly gains a reaction, both negative and positive.

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Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Nauman

http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/bruce-nauman


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Kara Walker

Kate Walker is an African-American artist who works with film and installations. She is most recognized for her black cut-paper silhouettes and panoramics which tell a story without words. Her messages often express race, gender, sexuality and identity. To be more specific it focuses a lot on history especially about African-Americans and the relationship between white men and slaves. It’s bold, risque and compelling. Simplistic in nature, her work is very intriguing with it’s minimal explanation, but obvious story-telling.  As the viewer you are meant to add your own interpretation which greatly keeps you involved. Some describe her work as nightmarish, yet fantastical with a cinematic feel. It’s daring and sometimes grotesque, but in a way shows the true reality of American history. 

Although Kara Walker’s work makes me feel uneasy, I still like it. I like it for the reason that it is so honest and powerful. The fact that it isn’t super detailed, but makes me want to see more or look closely. She gets her point across right away without any filler. For that, I greatly applaud her art. It is truly original and captivating.

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Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kara_Walker

http://content.time.com/time/specials/2007/time100/article/0,28804,1595326_1595332_1616818,00.html


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Muybridge’s Life Research

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Eadweard James Muybridge is an extremely famous English photographer recognized for his revolutionary studies of motion. It is thanks to him that film and movies are even possible. The reason for that being that Muybridge uncovered a way to make images show movement. It all started when a wealthy man asked him to photograph his prized horse, to see if it did at some point have it’s hooves off the ground when running. Muybridge then set up several cameras in a row and as the horse ran passed them each camera would go off, capturing each second of motion. Sure enough, they discovered that horses do indeed lift all hooves off the ground when running. This got the gears turning in Muybridge’s head and it was from then on that he dedicated his work to being time-based. He wanted to understand and reveal to others what it really looks like to capture these movements, from simple, to more in depth motions. Unfortunately, in 1860 he was severely injured from a runaway stagecoach incident. He suffered severe trauma to the head and records say he wasn’t ever quite the same. Still, Muybridge continued his research and educated the world on movement in addition to technological advances. This advancement is specific to film and motion pictures. Through his discoveries the phenakistoscope was created which got the idea of motion pictures started. As it would turn, the images appeared to move. More and more Muybridge was reinventing the world, changing the way we perceive things and creating a new form of entertainment. He would travel often from England, America and Europe, spreading his knowledge and educating everyone. Without him, who knows when or how we would have learned of such a thing. We take movement for granted, but it was through Muybridge that we learned the value of it. Muybridge will forever be remembered in history and for a great reason. Without him, we may not have all the amazing movies or shows of nowadays.

471px-Eadweard_Muybridge_-_Pi-Wi-Ack_(Shower_of_Stars),_Vernal_Fall,_400_Feet,_Valley_of_Yosemite_-_Google_Art_Project 600px-Phenakistoscope_3g07690u 799px-Boys_playing_Leapfrog 800px-The_Horse_in_Motion

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eadweard_Muybridge


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Museum Journal Blog – Living Critters from The Jungle

Exhibit: The Herrett Center in Twin Falls, ID Living Critters in The Jungle 

media: 2D and 3D

context: educational

Describe: My first impression was that I felt like I was entering a mini replica of the jungle or wild. The displays have large branches inside them and backgrounds that resemble untamed greenery or stones. The lighting is slightly dim making me feel like I’m in the wilderness or a shady place full of trees and wild life. The iguana and boa constrictor inside their individual cages seem relaxed. They look comfortable in their simulated natural environments. I would describe the installment as fun. It makes you feel like a kid again and you want to keep checking it out to see the reptiles move. It has wall text between the animal cages and text below the iguana’s cage. The information is about other animals from the jungle. It is all simulated to look like the jungle and like the reptiles are wild animals, but really they are probably more like pets. The point of view from the viewer’s perspective would be that you feel comfortable and intrigued. I’m reminded of being in the jungle with the animals greatly involving me into it. The meaning conveyed is to see these two animals in their natural habitat and to better understand what it’s like in the jungle. Some elements included are organic, closed form, interior, unity and space. Excluded elements would be open form and exterior. The choices the curator made might be influenced by finance budgeting what was and wasn’t included and politics might effect it in the way that it needs to educate children especially. Questions posed by this installment are why is it only an iguana and boa constrictor on display? Why not others or two different animals from the jungle? The context, funding and authorship influence this by how much information is included. It has minimal information, but enough to get it’s point across. The intended audience is people of all ages, but especially kids. It’s easy to read and understand. The atmosphere is friendly and exciting especially for young ones. it is an effective display. 


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Museum Journal Blog – Solve et Coagula

Exhibit: BSU Liberal Arts building, Solve et Coagula (A curious exhibit) Lost Letters by Tyler Campbell, Jessica Noel, Briana Maddox and Lauren Cavazos

Date: 4/11/14

Media: 2D and 3D

Context: Educational, Art

Describe: My first impression was I’m curious to understand what the significance of these letters are. They are nice, interesting drawers that are propped up so that people can see the contents within each. The drawers have letters, belongings and photos hinting that they once belonged to different people. To someone who hasn’t seen it, I would say it is an interesting installation about different kinds of lost letters. Specific words/phrases to characterize it would be personal, relatable, an assortment of belongings, tells of different times and circumstances, meaningful. It is in a glass display case with text about it and about each drawer. The objects appear as artifacts, but they are actually simulated. The point of view from the viewer is looking directly at and into these open drawers and their contents.The overall meaning is to get people thinking about an old form of communication and how not all letter reach their destination. The elements included are repition, interior, closed form, unity. Excluded elements are exterior, open form and uniform. Some of the decisions made for the information present could be financially based just for budgeting reasons. Money limits how much information and objects are shown.Questions posed would be how exactly did the messages not reach their destinations? It explains the jist of it, but not the full story. Context, funding and authorship influence the meaning by allowing the installation to properly explain it’s purpose and how it does so. The intended audience is for anyone familiar with letters or writing letters. I believe that it is effective because it’s right to the point of it’s meaning and presented understandably. Also believably.


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Diego Rivera

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Diego Rivera is one of the most famous Mexican painters and muralists of the 20th century. Long before marrying Frida Kahlo, he had become a notable figure. He created many murals mostly depicting Mexican history and culture. Some of his works were even too risky to show because of their non religious or offensive depictions. Diego was a volatile man with many harsh memories that effected his outlook. Although his personality could have used adjustments, his artwork was superb. He had been drawing since he was three and therefore his skills only got better, especially with the help of professional art schools. His art was so good and becoming increasingly popular, not just in Mexico but around the world. He even got to befriend Pablo Picasso and meet Henri Matisse.

Diego had a large interest in Mexico and it’s politics which shows in many of his works. He paints on walls and buildings, usually taken up all the space that he can. His attention to detail is great. Lighting, shadow, tones, perspective, composition, it is all very well done. In my opinion Diego is a very gifted artist with plenty of skill. Unlike Frida who generally stuck with a particular style, Diego from time to time changed it up. I find it understandable that he would be such a famous painter. 

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Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diego_Rivera

http://www.biography.com/people/diego-rivera-9459446#early-life&awesm=~oBEmDnRloPrjjA